Hi everyone,
We are still looking for HELP. We are a research driven organization committed to the conservation of New Zealand’s whales and dolphins. We support research projects throughout New Zealand focused on Hector’s & Maui dolphins, sperm whales, bottlenose dolphins and southern right whales, among others. As you can imagine this entails a massive logistic effort, and we rely on the use of reliable research vessels and towing vehicles. In order to continue our work we urgently need to buy a new truck.
All help is welcomed but we have a few ideas:
- You can donate money through our website, Facebook page or directly to our BNZ account 020912-022903500. No amount is too small! Everything helps!
- You and your friends can organize a fundraising event. Think of fun things that people would like, for example a quiz night, raffle, bake sale, car wash, etc.
- You can suggest fund raising events we could do!
- You can SHARE THIS POST and and invite people to like our Page to help us spread the word!
Thanks very much for your support. There are already awesome initiatives going on to help us raise some funds but we need a lot of help to afford a truck! 🙂
NZWDT Team
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***These photos are shared for educational and scientific purposes, click "next" for individual pictures. Internal anatomy photos can be requested via PM. Viewer discretion advised***
Hector’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori hectori) dissection during a class at #otagomarinescience leaded by professor Steve Dawson and Sophie White. This individual is a Hector’s dolphin male baby neonate that stranded alive after only a couple hours of being born at Toko Mouth (January 2018). Department of Conservation made the most humane decision and euthanized it, as it would have never survived in the wild. Euthanasia was conducted in a very fast and painless way and the carcass was sent to University of Otago. We are very grateful to be allowed to learn from it and we believe it is a way of honouring its life and the more we learn, the better we can contribute to the conservation of this endemic endangered species of New Zealand. The following pictures are of great scientific interest as this species is one of the least studied cetaceans worldwide, you can clearly see newborn features such as foetal folds along the body, folded dorsal fin and fluke, tongue, and even whiskers! (yes! They are born with a few whiskers, as hair is a characteristic of mammals). We hope you appreciate the photos. Photos by Jesu Valdés
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***These photos are shared for educational and scientific purposes, swipe for individual pictures. Internal anatomy photos can be requested via PM. Viewer discretion advised*** Hector’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori hectori) dissection during a class at University of Otago leaded by professor Steve Dawson and Sophie White. This individual is a Hector’s dolphin male baby neonate that stranded alive after only a couple hours of being born at Toko Mouth (January 2018). Department of Conservation made the most humane decision and euthanized it, as it would have never survived in the wild. Euthanasia was conducted in a very fast and painless way and the carcass was sent to University of Otago. We are very grateful to be allowed to learn from it and we believe it is a way of honouring its life and the more we learn, the better we can contribute to the conservation of this endemic endangered species of New Zealand. The following pictures are of great scientific interest as this species is one of the least studied cetaceans worldwide, you can clearly see newborn features such as foetal folds along the body, folded dorsal fin and fluke, tongue, and even whiskers! (yes! They are born with a few whiskers, as hair is a characteristic of mammals). We hope you appreciate the photos. Photos by Jesu Valdés

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